Some Of The Pros And Cons of Cloud Computing

iftr2015hyd.in

While cloud computing is undoubtedly beneficial for mid-size to large companies, it is not without its downsides, especially for smaller businesses. We now bring you a list of advantages of disadvantages of cloud computing, with a view to helping such establishments fully understand the concept of cloud computing.

As more and more charities and libraries move to cloud services, this technology is no longer novel: it’s becoming the dominant paradigm in IT.When TechSoup surveyed NGOs, nonprofits, and charities around the world in 2012, we found that lack of knowledge was the biggest barrier to adopting cloud services. We suspect that it is still a barrier. This article will help you understand what the cloud is and support you in investigating whether cloud solutions are right for your organization. We’ll introduce some basic cloud computing terminology and outline some of the advantages and disadvantages to cloud computing. Check for The Pros And Cons  of Cloud Computing in Linkedphone

Advantages of Cloud Computing

Tierney Smith of TechSoup Canada sums up the advantages nicely: “The move towards the cloud holds a lot of exciting potential for nonprofits of all sizes. Not only are many organizations able to realize cost savings through not having to run and maintain their own server(s) (or pay a consultant to do so), many cloud tools enable new levels of sharing and collaboration, which can transform how we work. We live in a world where our supporters are looking to us for greater transparency and there is an increasing need to partner with other organizations to achieve real impact. Using the right cloud tools can help us break down the barriers we currently face and be the more open, effective, and resilient organizations that we need to be.”

Reduced Support and Hardware Needs

As you move more business-critical applications into the cloud, you’ll likely find that you don’t need to upgrade computers as regularly, and many employees can make do without higher-end computers. That’s because the actual computing isn’t happening on the computer: A $200 tablet can access your Salesforce and Google Apps accounts just as quickly as a $2,000 premium laptop can. Similarly, you may find that a cloud computing infrastructure requires a smaller IT staff than a traditional IT setup does because your organization won’t be managing the software anymore.

Anywhere, Anytime Collaboration

Software as a service can act as a great simplifier for many organizations. If you have staff members working off-site, they can access their work just as easily at home as they can in the office. If they’re using a private or secure Wi-Fi connection, there’s also no need to set up a virtual private network (VPN).What’s more, cloud tools can make it easier to collaborate with colleagues from outside the organization. If you’re planning an event with staff from another nonprofit, for example, it’s easy to create a Basecamp project where everyone can see each other’s work. People working in the same organization might benefit from team collaboration tools like shared calendars, video conferencing, instant messaging, and file sharing via Office 365.

A Green Choice

Cloud computing solutions are also generally greener than traditional IT because they require less in-office IT equipment. While huge datacenters require a lot of electricity, it’s still a lot less than the thousands of office-grade computers it would take to perform the same big tasks. Large cloud computing providers can also optimize their datacenters for energy efficiency much more precisely than manufacturers of desktops and laptops can.

Disadvantages of Cloud Computing

Security and Availability

Security and availability are still the main concerns that most people have about relying on cloud-based services.You’ve probably heard of the many high-profile news stories of security breaches in cloud-based services. Although you should certainly think about the implications of a breach in your organizational data, you should also consider that in both cloud-based and on-premises software, most security breaches are attributable to human error. That is one reason why we published our 12 Tips to Being Safer Online.When thinking about cloud security and availability, you should also have a realistic sense of your current technology situation. Fears about the cloud are sometimes based on a utopian vision of an organization’s current situation. Odds are that your security isn’t perfect, you don’t have 100 percent systems uptime, and you may not have staff resources dedicated to IT management. In the cloud, security and management are in the hands of trained, dedicated experts.

Cloud Vendors Going Out of Business

Cloud computing is still a quickly changing field, and there’s always the danger that a new company might go out of business or radically change its service. A sudden change in service might not be too detrimental if you were only using the application for a one-time project, but it could be disastrous if you were using it for your entire donor database.When evaluating cloud providers, find out what options you have for backing up and extracting your data. The best services allow you to download your data in a standard, nonproprietary format.

The Need for Reliable Internet Service

Finally, you will become more dependent on a good Internet connection if you rely on the cloud. As more mission-critical work is done on the Internet, organizations will need much more bandwidth and few, if any, failures in Internet connectivity. If consistent Internet access, connection speed, or bandwidth are problems for your organization, cloud solutions may not be right for you at this time.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *